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WE ARE BEING MONITORED!

For as long as I've been a Driving Instructor the DVSA have wanted to publish our Pass Rates. Whilst this may seem a good thing, it can be a case of being careful what you wish for. I've written a previous blog on Pass Rates explaining the problems with this approach. One of the biggest problems with Pass Rates are that the Instructor is not the person always making the decision whether someone can sit the driving test. We would all love high pass rates. My question has always been, are people prepared to pay for the high pass rate?! So what are the DVSA doing?


The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is making 2 changes to the way that approved driving instructor (ADI) standards checks work.


The DVSA will look at 4 indicators. If we reach the triggers we will receive a Standards Check every 12 months on a rolling basis. DVSA will look at this data for the rolling 12-month period:

  • average number of driving faults per test

  • average number of serious faults per test

  • percentage of tests where the driving examiner had to take physical action in the interests of public safety

  • overall pass rate

Each of the 4 indicators has a trigger point.


Average number of driving faults per test 5 or greater


Average number of serious faults per test 0.5 or greater


Percentage of driving tests where the driving examiner had to take physical action 10% or higher


Driving test pass rate 55% or lower


If you reach the trigger point for 3 or more of the indicators, DVSA will write to ask you to book a standards check.


DVSA will prioritise giving support to ADIs who are exceeding the trigger points by the highest margins first.


If you reach the trigger point for fewer than 3 of the indicators, you’re less likely to be asked to take a standards check. However, you might still be asked to book a standards check during each 4-year registration period. The full report can be read here.


What does this mean to clients and their driving test? It will not change the driving test in any way. Most instructors are teaching to a high standard. However, it will change the way we operate. No one wants to be assessed on a regular basis, and there is nothing stopping the triggers being increased. The DVSA has pushed this in a way that makes instructors responsible for reducing the driving test waiting times.

Students will find it harder to find instructors at short notice. Students who have tests pre-booked will find it harder to find an instructor willing to take them on. This will change the way driving tests are booked and may have a slight impact on waiting times but it is not the solution to a problem.

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